top of page

The Remarkable Journey of Parisa Pirzadeh: From Playing in Tehran Symphony Orchestra to Receiving Fa



Speaker 1: Asher Laub

Speaker 2: Parisa Pirzadeh


Watch the entire interview here and read below for the full transcript:

https://youtu.be/j6ZPeHw-bxs?si=U1DxC_VSKjhirz3V


Speaker 1

·00:01

The Soundwave Chronicles podcast brought to you by FD Productions engages in conversations with pioneering musicians, producers and experts from the music industry. We get the inside scoop on what it takes to make it in the music industry today by delving into the sources of their inspiration, their creative process and much more as we explore a wide range of your experiences. I am your host, Asher Law, and I want to welcome you today. Sit back, relax and enjoy.


Speaker 2

·00:42

I have a very talented guest by the name of Hariza Pierzade, who's an amazing violinist viola. She's an award winning musician based in Tehran. She moved to the UK. She's only been there for about four years, but she performs there as well. It's really a pleasure to introduce Parisa. Welcome to the show. How are you doing today?


Speaker 3

·01:00

Hi. Thank you very much for inviting me to be on your show today.


Speaker 2

·01:03

Oh, it's a pleasure. So what does this week look like for you in terms of performances and studio work? What's like a normal week look like for somebody like yourself?


Speaker 3

·01:12

As a freelance musician, I would say that it's really good to be involved in different projects, to be called with, to go for playing for the orchestra and also to teach some pupils. If they offered you to do that, it would be absolutely fine to do this kind of stuff. I really like to spend my time working with people, working with music studios who record in the sessions and yes, it's good.


Speaker 2

·01:42

So you love what you do?


Speaker 3

·01:43

Yeah, exactly.


Speaker 2

·01:44

I really love now, I didn't really introduce our listeners to your bio, but I'm just going to sort of bring up little tidbits of the bio throughout this interview. So you started pretty young, you started at the age of ten in Tehran and I'm sure it was a very different experience from what you are facing now in the UK in terms of just quality of life. Do you want to tell me a little bit, like, some of the differences that you had maybe at the age of ten as a violinist, violist and today as an adult in the UK?


Speaker 3

·02:15

Yeah, as you said, I started playing the violin and viola at the age of ten when my parents sent me to the Terra Music School and I started to learn how to play the violin at the same time I started to play the villa as well. So my teacher just offered me if I was happy to do the same because he saw my potential to do these two instruments together and he offered me and I said, yes, I can do both of these instruments to play. And after six years, I graduated from Tehran Music School. And then I started my professional career in Tehran Symphony orchestra. So I auditioned for Terra Music Orchestra and then they offered me to play as a villa player in the orchestra sector for that time.


Speaker 3

·03:08

It was really hard for me to communicate with people 17 years old at first was really hard for me, but over time it gets better and better. I worked for Tehran Symphony Orchestra for four to five years and at the same time I studied the music in Art University of Tehran and I got my Master of Music Performance. And after five years I stopped working because I was into loads and lots of different project. I couldn't make all these two together. It was really hard to deal with two jobs at the same time. So I decided to do the freelancing, rather being a permanent player in an orchestra. And during that time, I started to play with various music orchestra, including both Persian Music Orchestra and the classical. We had our concert in different part of the world to perform for the audiences.


Speaker 3

·04:22

And as the most recent one, I can say I work for Czech Television Orchestra. I was actually invited as a guest, as a viola player to work for the Czech Television Orchestra to do some recording for them. Yes. And it continued for another three to four years doing kind of this stuff. And then I met my husband in one of my concert. He was one of the audiences. He sat in the first row of the audience and as I came to the stage, we actually first we just came, you know, we just we love each other at the first sight, you know. And then he and he proposed me after having a little connection, he proposed me if I was happy to marry him. And then we actually came to the UK. And yeah, I came to the UK in 2019.


Speaker 3

·05:41

And since then I tried to take up in various musical training courses in the hopes of getting my resume portfolio promoted. However, I know that I passed my Master of Music Performance, but I knew that it's really important that you have to be updated in terms of living in the first world country. Because I come from a third world country, it was really hard to get along with many things that is really different from your country. I hope that.


Speaker 2

·06:26

Could you give some specific examples of where it's more difficult in Tehran.


Speaker 3

·06:34

In terms of the musical education? Because, however, we had a very professional teachers to teach us how to play the violin or any other kind instruments. But when you move to the other country, which is not part of Middle East countries or even the third world countries, I think that things are going to be more complex. You have to be more capable. You have to prove your capability to be connected with those people who can connect you to the very more professional career or more professional. So what was your question, but what.


Speaker 2

·07:32

Were some of the challenges you mentioned that you encountered some challenges in Tehran that you would not have encountered in the US or the UK because of the nature of it being a third world country. Is it a lack of resources? Is it the pay not as good for the orchestra? Is it like limitations by the government in some capacity? Like maybe you couldn't play I don't know. Were you not able to play certain songs? Could you elaborate on that?


Speaker 3

·08:01

Yeah. However I don't want to put it into the politics but to make it more clear I remember that in the teenage I used to collect the CD players sorry, the CDs that on that time was really hard to use the applications in Iran because we didn't have as many applications as now we are using now right now. And I believe that I used to walk miles to get that CD, to be able to listen and then to play along. There was a backing track on that CD. And I remember that before my audition, I used to use that CD player, the CD one. Okay. But I remember that there was only one shop in Tehran that we could actually have all these CDs to buy that CD, to be able to listen and play along. Because of the limitation.


Speaker 2

·09:19

You're saying one of the limitations of living in Tehran was that you had limited access to music.


Speaker 3

·09:26

Exactly.


Speaker 2

·09:29

But as a classical musician, weren't you typically sight reading sheet music?


Speaker 3

·09:36

We actually do the sight reading as well. This is not something that really difficult to do. I think that sight reading. We can do the site reading as well as the playing the instruments.


Speaker 2

·09:52

But it was helpful, obviously, if you're auditioning for something to hear the song that you're going to audition for.


Speaker 3

·09:58

Yeah, exactly.


Speaker 2

·09:59

You really had to be very good at sight reading or at least memorizing the song if you didn't have to it on tape or CD. All right. I could personally attest to as a violinist, when I would audition for orchestras, I would definitely want to listen to the music over and over again before playing it, before challenging myself with the sight reading so I can identify with what you're talking about. And now, when you moved to the UK, did you find that life got a bit easier? Was there a language barrier that served as a challenge for you and your husband?


Speaker 3

·10:50

Yeah, at first it was really hard to actually communicate with English people because at first I realized that they don't have this tendency to speak with the foreigner people. And as we talked to friends, they just say, yeah, this normally happens when you are a foreigner, especially, it depends on the area that you are living. Some people would not rather to speak with the foreigner people, but some, yes, they are very open to speak. It depends on the area. Unfortunately, the area that were leaving, people were not actually open to speak or even have eye contact to be able to start conversation with them. But I actually was happy to start my communication to have connection with friends.


Speaker 3

·11:49

And I've made bunch of helpful friends around who were either studying at university or have graduated, and they were very helpful to share me to study in one of the UK universities. Because they say that it's a shame when you have this potential and to not let it find its own way. And these days I'm just thinking about going to the university, study my music to be able to promote it, improve my musical skills and put it into the professional practice.


Speaker 2

·12:29

So did you say that you're working at university now to improve your skills?


Speaker 3

·12:34

Yeah, I'm thinking about going to the university these days because since immigration to the UK, it took a lot of time to embark myself into the right position. I had to deal with so many different things in terms of the culture, the communication, everything was really different from my country. But I think that after four years I can say that this is time for me that I can think about myself, I can think that I can go whatever I want to do. And yes, I think maybe in the next one year I will have studied in one of the universities in Manchester, who knows?


Speaker 2

·13:22

And for those of you listeners who just kind of hopped on in the middle of the show, I'm speaking with a very talented violinist, violist, award winning producer and performer, Paris Appearzade. You won an award 2018 in Tehran for Best Classical Music Award. You did a performance of nine tracks.


Speaker 3

·13:41

With my brother, my twin brother with your brother.


Speaker 2

·13:43

Now what did you do to prepare for something as big as that and what did it feel like to win an award, like Best Classical Music Award, which is pretty significant.


Speaker 3

·13:54

To clarify this, I would say that luckily I have come from a musical family. My elder sister, who is twelve years missing, used to play the violin and I remember that since childhood I was overwhelmed with listening to her violin playing. She used to prepare herself for all the repertoire that she was asked for either audition or music exam. And my father actually has a very good voice. She used to sing before the revolution and after revolution he just stopped working at this field due to his personal reasons, I don't know.


Speaker 3

·14:41

And also my twin brother plays the piano and for this album, specifically for this album, I asked him if he could actually accompany me for some of the tracks as a pianist, as accompanies and yeah, here's the album that we won, the Clock of Honor for the Best Classical Music Performer of the year.


Speaker 2

·15:07

Did you mention that you did a recording with him in order to submit for the competition or was it a live performance?


Speaker 3

·15:16

No, it was recorded in his own music studio. As I said before, he has his own music studio in Tehran. And, yeah, I remember one day I asked him if it was not busy to do this kind of thing together, and he said yes, and he actually agreed to do this together. And I think that Puria. My brother's name is Puria. Puria did, I think, three to four tracks as an accompanist, and the other tracks, the repertoire was played as a viola or violin soloist. I play as this violin and viola soloist.


Speaker 2

·16:03

It's an incredible accomplishment what you won, and that must have given you a whole lot of confidence to continue this full time career as just a live musician and you were so successful 2018. Plus, just looking at your bio, ladies and gentlemen, if you want to check out Priest's bio, it's pretty extensive. You were on the Czech television Soundstage, you collaborated with poor Miriam Air music studio in Mean. You've really been around the block and you're very well connected. Why did you decide to move to the UK, even with all the achievements that you had gained in Tehran? No opportunities? Or was there something missing?


Speaker 3

·16:43

Because I got married.


Speaker 2

·16:45

Oh, okay, that's clear. But he was in Tehran.


Speaker 3

·16:49

No, he used to live in the UK for about 18 years and when I had a concert in one of the venue in the London, he just came as an audience and we just met each other there. Yeah, and I came back to Tehran and then he moved to Tehran to know.


Speaker 2

·17:12

I thought your husband was from oh, he moved back to Tehran to propose. Okay. But he was originally from Tehran, so.


Speaker 3

·17:20

You had the same yeah, he's Iranian as well. Yeah.


Speaker 2

·17:25

So that works out great. So it was sort of a no brainer, like you weren't going to have him move to Tehran. He said, no, you got to move to the UK for this to work out.


Speaker 3

·17:36

Because he used to live for about 18 years and it was really hard for him to cut everything and get back to Iran. And he just asked me if I was happy to come to the UK and I said, yeah, okay, it could be another option, I can come with you.


Speaker 2

·17:57

Right, so it was a love at first sight, no brainer. You moved to the UK. Now, as far as the professional opportunities, did you feel like you lost something from Tehran when you moved to the UK or do you feel like, okay, this is just the same thing? It's just the challenge is the culture.


Speaker 3

·18:16

This is a question that everyone asks since coming to the know. My friends just look at my profile and they say, oh, Paris, you were so professional in your art field and why did you move to the UK? Because you already know how to get your followers, how to show yourself. And I said that this is life, we can't actually predict what happens. But I'm happy now because after four years. I'm just starting to find my way to be able to what actually I want to do. I think that it's enough for me.


Speaker 2

·19:02

Which is what? What is it that you actually want to do?


Speaker 3

·19:08

I really want to be as a viola soloist one day, and I think that I can now start by thinking about going to the university and starting studying in the university to be able to see people who can connect me to different orchestras. I would like to study specifically the Villa soloist subject. And I think that now it's time I can take my steps bigger to be able to get that dream.


Speaker 2

·19:52

Now, have you worked on original compositions that you've published to Spotify? Or is your main mission to just sort of to play classical music with orchestras that are already pre written, like Bach, Beethoven, that type of.


Speaker 3

·20:17

Have. If you have listened to my new album, which is called beyond the Sea, it's now streaming on all music platforms. Since coming to the England, I felt that I'm alone. I had to do something to fill that gap and I started to compose my own tracks. The album consists of five tracks, my own composition, and I played only piano and violin for all these tracks.


Speaker 2

·20:57

Now, before you continue, how can our listeners find your music? Do they go to your website? Parisapirzada, was it?


Speaker 3

·21:08

Yeah, exactly. I put all the tracks on my website and even if they can pop my name into the Google search, paris appears. I think it will automatically my album will come up automatically if they just pop my name Parisade.


Speaker 2

·21:31

Okay, and if they want to find you on other platforms, do they just go to Parisade spelled D-E-H at the end? And is there a link to that they could easily find your music?


Speaker 3

·21:48

Exactly.


Speaker 2

·21:48

Yeah, this is her website, actually. Let's see if I could yeah, this is her website. Very professional, very cool looking. Thank you, ladies and gentlemen. You can scroll down and check out her amazing bio and all of her music. So check that out and stream her music on Spotify and all platforms. But I see there's a bunch of YouTube music videos as right?


Speaker 3

·22:16

Yeah, this is my YouTube channel. Yeah. Do you want to I'm not very busy these days to put my videos on YouTube because these just I'm teaching a know I have lots and lots of people who come to mind to have their private violent lesson and I think that one day my friend said, well, Paris, come on, that's enough. You're just teaching too much. That's why I can't find any time to put my video on YouTube channel. That's why.


Speaker 2

·23:00

Your schedule is full with teaching and mentoring younger or other aspiring violins and violinists.


Speaker 3

·23:08

Exactly.


Speaker 2

·23:09

And how do you enjoy that?


Speaker 3

·23:11

Yeah, I love teaching. Yeah. As a propaganda, I've been working in one of the music center. I think it's most well known music center in the Manchester one education, if you search its name. I've been working with them for three years and now I have seven to ten pupils to teach vidan and viola. Both vidan and viola. And sometimes they call me to go to the different schools to deliver music workshop or music lesson for children. And apart from these activities, sometimes I'm called to do the different task which actually comes from my culture. For their most recent one, I can include Music Action International. We work with four different schools in Manchester to be able to teach them how to sing a song which has actually come from a different part of the board.


Speaker 3

·24:34

And we actually get them all into the stage to play for the audiences. It was a massive stage. It was my first time to get all my children to come to the stage and to conduct the sign that was originally from Iran. And they actually sing the sign better than me. Yeah, sing the sign, the Persian language. They were able to sing that song in Persian language better than me. It was incredible.


Speaker 2

·25:13

By the way, some of my favorite culinary cuisine is Persian food. Just aside Persian food. No, some of my favorite food is Persian.


Speaker 3

·25:24

Persian food.


Speaker 2

·25:26

Syrian and Persian food. Like my whole family, we love that stuff. Just as a side point. Anyway, back to what you were saying.


Speaker 3

·25:33

Yeah. And also I'm invited to do some music worship, as I said, as part of the festivals. As the most recent one, I can say the Horizon and the Den Festival was the last festival that I work with loads of children to teach them how to count the musical beats and how to produce a sound in a better way. And I don't know if you know that I can play one of the Persian music instrument, which is called grey chak. It's hard to pronounce, but grey chak, yeah, greychak is like a tiny cello, but it has a very low sound. It's really hard to produce a sound as much as you produce with the cello.


Speaker 2

·26:39

Is the fingering the same?


Speaker 3

·26:41

It's fingering, yeah. But it has four things.


Speaker 2

·26:46

Is it the same fingering as a cello?


Speaker 3

·26:49

Yes, exactly. And it's the same tuning, like ADGC? Yeah, the same tuning. But the only difference is that the raychack has a very low sound, as I said, and it doesn't have any you know, it doesn't have any difficulty to play. You can easily play the gay check. It has only one position to play and everything should be very easy to play. And yes, I use that Kjack to make sure that children can produce a sound. I remember the one that I took my Kjack to that festival, and the lady came to me and said, oh, my God. It has a very dark sound when you play. And she was actually interested in learning this instrument and I said that it should be very easy for you to play.


Speaker 3

·28:16

And since then she is my rachai pupil, she's English, but she just realized that it's something different that she can play. And sometimes she texts me a message. She said that Paris, I'm playing this instrument in front of my friends and family and they are really happy for me to learn the different instruments. I think that this is something very new for them and I can actually develop this activity and put it into the different projects because I realize that this is something new and I can.


Speaker 2

·29:09

Know. I'd love to check this out. I don't know too much about it. I know the cello. But let me ask you, do you have any association with the Suzuki method?


Speaker 3

·29:22

Suzuki method? Yeah, I think Suzuki method I used to practice a lot when I was in teenage period. I remember my teacher gave me a Suzuki method and I chose only five attitudes of that book to play for the exam for violin and Villa Suzuki has a method for violin viola. Actually, the original one is for violin and it transcribed or transposed to the viola. And we used to work both versions because we had to do this for the exam. I remember that I had to play both versions for the music exam, which was really hard for me. But at the end I was actually able to do both versions for the jury. And yeah, I really like the method. It's very unique. These days I'm giving this method to my pupils to work especially.


Speaker 3

·30:45

It has 40 studies and normally I choose the last ten study for pupils who are in between the intermediate to advanced level. Yes.


Speaker 2

·31:05

But what I didn't understand is if you're using a different what the other approach to your teaching method is called. So it sounds like you used Suzuki earlier, but that's not a method that you use with your kids now.


Speaker 3

·31:25

In the UK, normally the teachers give their students when they are the beginners, when they are about to start the violin, how to learn the violin. They normally give the Violin Star book to the kids. Violin Star and it has with three books violence Star, one, two, three and after third book they're able to go to the grade one. I don't know if you have heard about the ABRSM method in the UK. ABRSM is the organization that pupils can go to do the exam to be able to pass the level and then they get a certificate and then after eight it has eight levels and after eight they are able to teach in organization or any other.


Speaker 2

·32:27

And you went through all those levels?


Speaker 3

·32:30

Pardon?


Speaker 2

·32:31

And you went through all those levels yourself?


Speaker 3

·32:34

Yeah, I passed all this grade. I did it before the COVID but after the COVID they just set a new method to do the digital exam. It's really easier than the face to face exam I did face to face exam. Apart from performance, the examiner normally ask you to do some site reading, and you're required to play different skills as well as they assess you, how you can get aligned with different musical aspects. And you have to show yourself how to be prepared for every question that they come up and they ask from you.


Speaker 2

·33:37

Now, what percentage of your so you're spending a lot of time in the educational realm, and you're also doing performances. So what percentage of your schedule would you say is taken up with performances versus education? How much time are you spending educating other students versus performing?


Speaker 3

·34:03

Yeah, so I think that I spend more hours teaching than practicing these days. Especially these days, I'm just involved with this activity because when you prove yourself as a good violin teacher, you get this offer. You actually have this offer to work with different organizations. And I think that these days, I really love teaching more practicing, because when you teach, you get much more experience. In my perspective, I'm not sure if I'm right or wrong, but actually, in the past, I didn't teach at all, but since coming to the UK after taking up various musical training course, I just realized that, okay, that's time that I can teach. And since starting teaching, I just realized that, oh, this is a very good activity.


Speaker 3

·35:22

I really want to be surrounded with this atmosphere, and I think that it could be a reason that I want to go to university, to study music, to be able to teach in this art field, maybe in the college or university, I'm not sure, but I really love teaching.


Speaker 2

·35:48

You sound like you're a very patient person, which is definitely a prerequisite to teaching. Patience, calm, like focus, those are all vibes that I get from you.


Speaker 3

·36:01

Yeah.


Speaker 2

·36:02

So your aspirations, what are your goals as far as professionally in the next year, the next five years, next ten years? You mentioned you want to possibly be a professor, or do you want to play with the symphonies? You want to be a soloist, an artist, or all of the above?


Speaker 3

·36:25

Yeah, all of the above, actually. But personally, however, I really like to do teaching. I would like to be appointed as a member of international orchestra one day to either be called as a villa soloist or be called to sit along with the other musicians in the orchestra. But I think that it's more exciting to play and practice and share the technical exercises with the other musicians. But sometimes I think that the teaching could be another option. I have these two. I'm not pretty sure which one I actually want to pick. It's really hard.


Speaker 2

·37:23

Okay, well, that's great that I guess you're in the best possible predicament for your situation, because whether you end up doing more teaching, you'll be happy. Whether you end up doing more performances. You'll be happy.


Speaker 3

·37:36

Exactly.


Speaker 2

·37:37

Both you'll be happy. So you just sound like a happy person. That's great.


Speaker 3

·37:42

Yeah, because I'm a very flexible person. I can actually get on with everything very easily. This is my personality. I don't nag, I don't complain. I just try to be flexible with every situation that I'm in, it well.


Speaker 2

·38:03

We need more people in this world like you flexible, don't complain. That's a trait. That's an attribute that is undervalued, I think I wanted to kind of shift the conversation a little bit to I don't know what the word as ergonomics, but the way that you hold that you position your instrument. And as a teacher, if you could share with the rest of us, even myself, as violinists, have played many years, and I've had back pain over many years, and I know that there are different ways of holding the instrument. I actually use a TheraBand for my electric violin. What types of recommendations do you have? I don't know if you experience any back pain at all. What types of guidance could you provide for us as far as how you hold the instrument, ways to reduce pain, maybe exercise?


Speaker 2

·38:56

Do you have any insights into that you share with your students?


Speaker 3

·39:01

Fortunately, I've never had the experience to deal with kind of these with my pupils, but I can say if you have problem with how to hold the violin on your shoulder properly, is it because of using the shoulder rest? Are you using the shoulder rest? Because sometimes my pupils found it very difficult to use the shoulder rest. That's why I'm asking them to okay, take them off and then just use the cloth, the tiny cloth to cover that part. I'm not sure. But normally when they have difficulty using their shoulder rest, they use a cloth and they said that it's better to use the cloth rather using the shoulder rest. I think that one of the reasons that the wildlife have the pain whilst they are playing the wildly in the shoulder resting. Yeah.


Speaker 3

·40:12

I can say that it's really rare that you see people using the shoulder rest have the pain.


Speaker 2

·40:26

Do you play without a shoulder rest?


Speaker 3

·40:30

Depends on what actually what character. For example, if I'm doing the violin in an orchestra, I don't use a shoulder rest, honestly. But if I want to record something or if I want to practice, yes, I have my shoulders on the violin.


Speaker 2

·40:50

Okay, so you do a little bit of both. And how about alignment? I noticed violinists like Joshua Bell Virtuos is like him. He plays a little bit like this, and he sort of lifts his head up. I don't know if that's a habit or if he's told to do that in order to reduce his back pain to improve the alignment. Because when you're playing like this, you're hyperextending these muscles playing really fast like Paganini. So is there a benefit. To maybe playing more to the left here. It's showing right on my video. But this is the left part of my body.


Speaker 3

·41:30

Yeah. One method that I can give you is that before playing, sometimes it's really important that you warm up. You get your fingers flexible by doing some exercise before playing the violin. For example, I'm giving this method to my kids, actually, to the children who are less than five years or six years or they actually have this exercise. Yeah, just do it ten times. After ten times, you can feel that, the blood circulation in your hand. And I think this exercise might be really helpful and useful. Before getting yourself to play that violin.


Speaker 2

·42:19

You don't feel the need to do any stretching or strengthening of your arms or your back when you play?


Speaker 3

·42:26

I don't actually give this exercise to the kids, but yeah, for the teenage or even more age group. Yeah, I can give adolescent yeah.


Speaker 2

·42:40

For example, for yourself, are you doing any exercises to keep yourself in shape for the constant playing?


Speaker 3

·42:48

Yeah, three times a week I go walking, and I do yuga once a week. I think that these exercises can actually help because normally I don't have any pain when I play the violin. I can actually feel that how it could be really painful when people talking about the issue that they have while they are playing the violin. But fortunately, it has never happened to me.


Speaker 2

·43:26

You're obviously very healthy.


Speaker 3

·43:28

Maybe. Yeah.


Speaker 2

·43:35

I thought you mentioned, like, a yoga type of activity. You don't do any of those types of exercises?


Speaker 3

·43:41

Yeah, actually, I do it online. I have a private tutor who is actually working with me online in Iran. So we use a mat. There are lots of different exercises for doing the yuka, but we normally do half an hour. Only half an hour?


Speaker 2

·44:08

Could you tell me what yuka is?


Speaker 3

·44:11

Yuga?


Speaker 2

·44:12

Yuga. Yoga. Oh, it was a pronunciation thing. I thought you were describing a different type of exercise. I didn't know. So you're talking about yoga. Okay.


Speaker 3

·44:22

Yoga.


Speaker 2

·44:23

Yoga you find to be helpful.


Speaker 3

·44:25

Yeah, definitely. I normally give this advice to my students. Do your yoga. Am I said correctly? Yoga?


Speaker 2

·44:37

No, I'm not criticizing. I didn't know what you were referring to. So that's pretty cool. And you enjoy it, and you find that it helps you help a lot. Frank.


Speaker 3

·44:53

They'Re just complaining. Teacher we don't have any time to do the exercise. I just advise them. Just do yoga. Yoga. You can benefit from you doing the yoga more than any other activity, like jogging, doing bicycle, et cetera. But do yoga, please.


Speaker 2

·45:15

Okay. So you hear it straight from the professional. You should do yoga if you want to keep yourself healthy and in shape, and that's an important thing to do as a violinist. Before we head out, I want to just have you remind us where we can find where all of our listeners can find your music and where we can stay connected with you on social media. For instance, how can people reach out to you if they want to book you or if they want to learn from you or if they just want to listen to your music?


Speaker 3

·45:48

Yeah, sure. I think the best way that people can actually find me is my website. I have mentioned all the details on my website just underneath of my page. If you just scroll down, you can actually see all the details that I've mentioned, my email address, even my phone number. And yeah, they can get connected.


Speaker 2

·46:15

And what if they want to just connect with daily updates? Where else could they find you if they want to see what Paris is up to? Her latest okay, instagram is the main thing, not Facebook or Twitter. So I'm going to pull it up right now just to show people, just so they know, this is on Instagram and her website is right there in the bio. And I want to welcome you to check out this very talented violinist and teachers music on Spotify. Also you can check out Spotify there. It's been a pleasure speaking with you. Thank you so much for coming.


Speaker 1

·46:59

Thanks so much for tuning into the Soundwave Chronicles podcast where you can stream our interviews where ever you get your podcast. We hope you enjoyed the interview and learned something new today. And if you did, please leave a review so we can keep bringing you great content. Thank you and have a great rest of the week.


1 view0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page